Food State Nutrients

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What are Food State Nutrients?

 

Please also read Answering Trace Element Deficiency

 

Food State Nutrients Available

 

Chromium

Selenium

Multi-Trace Complex

Zinc

 

They are produced by growing the nutritional yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Nothing to do with candida albicans!) in a nutrient enriched medium, e.g rich in the trace elements when preparing for the multi-trace. This single-celled organism (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is naturally rich in a range of minerals, essential amino acids, B-vitamins, complex carbohydrates and enzymes. The yeast also has the ability to incorporate more nutrients. The yeast is a living organism, which metabolises the nutrient-rich broth. The yeast in the presence of all the nutrients from the broth undergoes a process of growth, fermentation and biotransformation to produce a wholesome, vitalised, concentrated food.

 

An enzyme digestion process then breaks down the yeast membrane so that there is no active yeast left in the Food State nutrients once the process is finished. In fact the whole yeast cell structure no longer exists, yet it retains all the vital nutritional components in an easily digestible.

 

Food state nutrients have been tested by independent laboratories who found that they are significantly better absorbed, longer retained and better used than standard chemical supplements. They do not need to be taken with food as they contain all the necessary food factors needed for absorption. They have no known allergic reactions and are suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

 

The growth process - what actually happens?


The production of vitamins and minerals is slightly different, but both require a growth process to allow the nutrient to emulate natural food. The minerals, B vitamins and vitamin D3 are grown in a special strain of yeast called Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This single-celled organism is naturally rich in a range of minerals, essential amino acids, B-vitamins, complex carbohydrates and enzymes. The yeast also has the ability to incorporate more nutrients. The growth process and the activation process have characteristic differences, which are looked at separately below

 

The Mineral Growth Process


The growing process takes place in large stainless steel tanks. There are two sets of tanks. The first stage begins with a tank containing a nutrient-rich broth, which consists of a proprietary complex blend of carbohydrates (such as molasses) and vegetable proteins, which vary depending on the nutrient being grown. The specific nutrient being transformed into Food State is then added. The nutrient broth and the added isolated nutrient are thoroughly mixed.


In the second stage the nutritive broth is introduced into the growth tank. This tank contains the yeast solution. The yeast is a living organism, which metabolises the nutrient-rich broth. The yeast in the presence of all the nutrients from the broth undergoes a process of growth, fermentation and biotransformation to produce a wholesome, vitalised, concentrated food. For example, if one feeds selenium to a growing culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, under appropriate conditions, selenium will find its receptor sites and incorporate itself into sulphur containing amino acids such as cysteine and methionine. During metabolism the sulphur groups are replaced with selenium and the finished product contains protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with selenomethionine and selenocysteine embedded therein. This process can take anywhere from 12-24 hours, depending on which nutrient is being metabolised.

The growth process is monitored by an infra-red spectrophotometer. This instrument identifies a single food matrix resulting from the process. Once this process is complete, vegetarian digestive enzymes are introduced. This process breaks down the cell wall. The final step is to dry the finished product. This is accomplished with a rapid drying process (spray drying) to protect the nutrients. This is the same process as is used to dry enzymes whilst retaining their activity. The resultant powder is subjected to rigorous physical, chemical and microbiological quality control tests before being passed for release.

Most people who have yeast allergies are sensitive to the proteins in the yeast wall membrane. The enzyme digestion process breaks down this membrane so that there is no active yeast left in the Food State nutrients once the process is finished. In fact the whole yeast cell structure no longer exists, yet it retains all the vital nutritional components in an easily digestible form

  

Disclaimer: Regenerative Nutrition advocate a holistic approach to natural health and wellbeing.   The body's ability and power to heal depends upon the totality of diet, nutrition, lifestyle and environmental factors.  No claims for the cure of any disease is intended, or implied.  Always consult a health care practitioner when combating disease states.   The statements in this article have not been approved by the FDA.